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Welcome to Volusia County
 
 
County Information
 
 
 
     
 
 
 
The U.S. Census Bureau 2005 estimate for the county's population was 496,575. Although Daytona Beach is Volusia County's best-known city, its county seat is DeLand, and its most populous city is currently Deltona.

Volusia County is the sole county of the Deltona-Daytona Beach-Ormond Beach, Florida, Metropolitan Statistical Area, which is the 101st-largest metro area by population in the United States as of the 2004 Census estimate. Volusia County is traversed from north to south by the important highways Interstate 95 and US Route 1. It also sits at the northeastern end of the Interstate 4, where it merges with Interstate 95.

Cities in Volusia County include Daytona Beach, Daytona Beach Shores, De Bary, De Land, De Leon Springs, Deland, Deltona, Edgewater, Glencoe, Holly Hill, Lake Helen, New Smyrna Beach, North Deland, Oak Hill, Orange City, Ormond Beach, Ormond-by-the-Sea, Pierson, Ponce Inlet, Port Orange, Samsula-Spruce Creek, South Daytona and West Deland.

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  County Demographics  
 
 
     
 
 
  As of the census of 2000, there were 443,343 people, 184,723 households, and 120,069 families residing in the county. The population density was 402 people per square mile (155/km). There were 211,938 housing units at an average density of 192 per square mile (74/km). The racial makeup of the county was 86.11% White, 9.29% Black or African American, 0.31% Native American, 1.00% Asian, 0.04% Pacific Islander, 1.82% from other races, and 1.43% from two or more races. 6.57% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. 13.7% were of German, 11.5% Irish, 11.2% English, 10.7% American and 8.7% Italian ancestry according to Census 2000.

There were 184,723 households out of which 24.10% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 50.40% were married couples living together, 10.90% had a female householder with no husband present, and 35.00% were non-families. 27.90% of all households were made up of individuals and 13.60% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.32 and the average family size was 2.82.

In the county the population was spread out with 20.30% under the age of 18, 8.20% from 18 to 24, 25.30% from 25 to 44, 24.20% from 45 to 64, and 22.10% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 42 years. For every 100 females there were 94.50 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 91.80 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $35,219, and the median income for a family was $41,767. Males had a median income of $30,573 versus $22,471 for females. The per capita income for the county was $19,664. About 7.90% of families and 11.60% of the population were below the poverty line, including 16.30% of those under age 18 and 7.10% of those age 65 or over.
 
 
 
     
 
 
     
 
 
  County History  
 
 
     
 
 
  Volusia County established in 1855, was named for the port of Volusia on the east bank of the St. John's River. The origins of the word "Volusia" are unclear, though there are several theories. The land area of present day Volusia County was inhabited by the indigenous Timucua indians. The Timucua no longer exist as a distinct racial entity, having been decimated by war and disease after contact with European settlers. Evidence of their habitation can still be seen in various areas of Volusia County such as the large shell middens at Tomoka State Park.

During the British occupation of Florida, a failed colony was started in southeast Volusia County by Andrew Turnbull, known as New Smyrna. This colony was connected to St. Augustine, the capital of East Florida, via the Kings Road. After the failure of the colony the settlers, many of Minorcan heritage made the 70-mile (110 km) journey to live in St. Augustine.

The Seminole indians, descendants of the Creek tribe of Alabama and Georgia who resisted forced relocation to Indian Territory also camped in various parts of Volusia County. During the Second Seminole War (1836–1842) a large sugar plantation in what is today the city of Daytona Beach was burned by the Seminole.

On the east shore of the St. Johns River in Volusia, south of present day Debary, General Winfield Scott established a fort/depot in 1836 named Fort Florida.

 

 
 
 
     
 
 
     
 
     
     
 
 
 

 

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